Daily Archives: October 24, 2011

Go on and be a storage extraordinaire

ex·tra·or·di·naire – Outstanding or remarkable in a particular capacity

I was plucking the Internet after dinner while I am holidaying right now in Port Dickson. And at about this time, the news from my subscriptions will arrive, perfectly timed as my food is digesting.

And in the news – “IDC Says Cloud Adoption Fuels Storage Sales”. You think?

We are generating so much data in this present moment, that IDC is already saying that we are doubling our data every 2 years. That’s massive and a big part of it is being fueled our adoption to Cloud. It doesn’t matter if it is a public, private or hybrid cloud because the way we use IT has changed forever. It’s all too clear.

Amazon has a massive repository of contents; Google has been gobbling tons of data and statistics since its inception; Apple has made IT more human; and Facebook has changed the way we communicate. FastCompany magazine called Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook the Big 4 and they will converge sooner or later into what the tornado chasers call a Perfect Storm. Every single effort that these 4 companies are doing now will inevitably meet at one point, where content, communication, computing, data, statistics all become the elements of the Perfect Storm. And the outcome of this has never been more clearer. As FastCompany quoted:

“All of our activity on these devices produces a wealth of data, which leads to the third big idea underpinning their vision. Data is like mother’s milk for Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. Data not only fuels new and better advertising systems (which Google and Facebook depend on) but better insights into what you’d like to buy next (which Amazon and Apple want to know). Data also powers new inventions: Google’s voice-recognition system, its traffic maps, and its spell-checker are all based on large-scale, anonymous customer tracking. These three ideas feed one another in a continuous (and often virtuous) loop. Post-PC devices are intimately connected to individual users. Think of this: You have a family desktop computer, but you probably don’t have a family Kindle. E-books are tied to a single Amazon account and can be read by one person at a time. The same for phones and apps. For the Fab Four, this is a beautiful thing because it means that everything done on your phone, tablet, or e-reader can be associated with you. Your likes, dislikes, and preferences feed new products and creative ways to market them to you. Collectively, the Fab Four have all registered credit-card info on a vast cross-section of Americans. They collect payments (Apple through iTunes, Google with Checkout, Amazon with Amazon Payments, Facebook with in-house credits). Both Google and Amazon recently launched Groupon-like daily-deals services, and Facebook is pursuing deals through its check-in service (after publicly retreating from its own offers product).”

Cloud is changing the way we work, we play, we live and data is now the currency of humans in the developed and developing worlds. And that is good news for us storage professionals, because all the data has to eventually end up in a storage somewhere, somehow.

That is why there is a strong demand for storage networking professionals. Not just any storage professionals but the ones that have the right attitude to keep developing themselves, enhancing their skillset, knowledge and experience. The ones that can forsee that the future will worship them and label them as deities of the Cloud era.

So why are you guys take advantage of this? Well, don’t just sit there and be ordinary. Be a storage extraordinaire now! And for those guys who want to settle of being ordinary … too bad! I said this before – You could lose your job.

Happy school holidays!

Does all SSDs make sense?

I have been receiving a lot of email updates from Texas Memory Systems for many months now. I am a subscriber to their updates and Texas Memory System is the grand daddy of flash and DRAM-based storage systems. They are not cheap but they are blazingly fast.

Lately, more and more vendors have been coming out with all SSDs storage arrays. Startups such Pure Storage, Violin Memory and Nimbus Data Systems have been pushing the envelope selling all SSDs storage arrays. A few days ago, EMC also announced their all SSDs storage array. As quoted, the new EMC VNX5500-F utilizes 2.5-in, single-level cell (SLC) NAND flash drives to 10 times the performance of the hard-drive based VNX arrays. And that is important because EMC has just become one of the earliest big gorillas to jump into the band wagon.

But does it make sense? Can one justify to invest in an all SSDs storage array?

At this point, especially in this part of the world, I predict that not many IT managers are willing to put their head on the chopping board and invest in an all SSDs storage array. They would become guinea pigs for a very expensive exercise and the state of the economy is not helping. Therefore the automatic storage tiering (AST) might stick better than having an all SSDs storage array. The cautious and prudent approach is less risky as I have mentioned in a past blog.

I wrote about Pure Storage in a previous blog and the notion that SSDs will offer plenty of IOPS and throughput. If the performance gain translates into higher productivity and getting the job done quicker, then I am all for SSDs. In fact, given the extra performance numbers

There is no denying that the fact that the industry is moving towards SSDs and it makes sense. That day will come in the near future but not now for customers in these part of the world.